Tag Archives: wholemeal

Brownies with a difference

What a great way to increase your fibre intake….

These brownies are delicious, you would not know that they have chickpeas in them!

The addition of chickpeas allows the amount of fat you would normally add to brownies to be greatly reduced and of course the fibre greatly increased.

I was a bit doubtful myself as to what they would turn out like, but I will definitely be making them again…enjoy!

Hi Fibre Brownies

Makes 16 brownies

Ingredients

  • 1 tbsp linseeds
  • 1 cup cooked chickpeas, drained and rinsed
  • 1 1/2 tsp vanilla essence
  • 1/2 cup canola oil
  • 4  eggs
  • 3/4 cup wholemeal self raising flour
  • 1 1/4 cups sugar
  • 1/2 cup dark cocoa powder

Directions

Preheat oven to 170ºC

Line a 8″ x 8″ cake tin with baking paper.

In a blender, process linseeds to a fine powder.  Add chickpeas and process until smooth.  Add vanilla, oil
and eggs.  Blend for 10-20 seconds to a smooth consistency.

In a mixing bowl, combine sifted flour, sugar and cocoa.

Add combined bean mixture to dry ingredients, mix well.

Pour batter into baking dish.

Bake for 30-35  minutes, or until brownies are cooked through and knife inserted in the centre comes out clean.

Each (60g) brownie has 816kJ or 194 calories, 1 g of saturated fat and 2g of fibre

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Filed under Chocolate, Slices

Lemon Blueberry and Polenta Cakes

This morning I bought a new cake tin and was bursting to use it.  It’s a mini bundt cake pan (how cute!)

These lemon cakes were the first idea I came up with to use my new pan for 2 reasons –  1. we have a pile of lemons to use and 2. I saw this recipe only last week on  Cooking Light which really took my fancy! (Mind you I didn’t make the exact recipe, I played around with it just a little – first I only did 1/2 the quantity, I used wholemeal self raising flour, I cut the sugar down to 1/3 rather than 1/2 cup (all American recipes are too sweet) and of course added some frozen blueberries (YUM!))

One of the things I love about low fat cakes is the simple muffin style way of making them.  Two bowls are needed, one for wet and one for dry ingredients.  The fat most often used is liquid, either oil or melted butter.  Once the wet and dry ingredients have been mixed together separately, the two are combined and gently folded together until only just mixed through.  Over-mixing can develop the gluten in the flour (that’s why you knead dough) which will develop a tough, rough textured muffin or cake in this case!

Although that sounds long and complicated, this type of cake is actually really quick and easy to make.  Much faster than a traditional beat butter and sugar, add eggs one at a time, blah blah…. full fat cake, and a lot less mess (well, in my kitchen there is!)

These cakes apart from looking really cute are rather delicious, especially with the polenta which gives them that slight textured crunch which I really like.  I fancied putting a glaze on them to get that lovely drizzled effect running down the bumpy edges, however they don’t need it and are just as delicous naked :)

In summer a few fresh blueberries could be added to the centre hole and on the top to really lift presentation.  I tried with a few de-frosted frozen blueberries but they looked a little deflated!

These little cakes could even do as a really light, portion controlled dessert – at only around 130 calories each, I think that is a pretty light dessert option.  Enjoy :)

Lemon and blueberry polenta cakes

  • 2/3 cup (100g) wholemeal self raising flour
  • 1/4 cup cornmeal/ polenta
  • 1/3 cup  sugar
  • 1/3 cup frozen blueberries
  • Zest of 1 lemon
  • 1  large egg
  • 1/3  cup  low fat buttermilk (I used ½ low fat milk, ½ low fat natural yoghurt)
  • 30ml (1 ½ tablespoons) olive oil

Preheat oven to 170 degrees.  Spray or brush 8 holes of a 12 hole mini bundt tin with a small amount of oil (alternately use a regular muffin pan, but they will take a little longer to cook)

Combine sifted flour, polenta, sugar, blueberries and lemon zest in a medium sized bowl, mix well to combine ingredients and coat blueberries with flour. Make a well in centre of mixture.

In a smaller bowl, whisk egg, then add buttermilk and oil, whisking well. Add buttermilk mixture to flour mixture, stirring gently until completely combined. Carefully spoon batter into the 8 prepared pans and smooth top. Bake at 170° for 12-14 minutes or until firm to touch. 

Allow to cool in tin for 2-3 minutes before loosening each cake gently around edges with your fingers, then flip tray onto a cooling rack allowing the cakes to pop out of the tin.  Allow to cool almost completely before drizzling with the glaze mixture, or enjoy just as they are!

Optional Icing glaze

  • 2 tablespoons icing sugar
  • 3-4 teaspoons lemon juice

Mix together to desired consistency.  Using a teaspoon, drizzle over cooled cakes

Makes 8 cakes @ 52g each

543kJ/129 calories

4g fat, 0.7g saturated fat

18g carbohydrate, 1.8g fibre

With icing glaze

589kJ/140 calories each

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Filed under Cakes, Cupcakes, Muffins

Spelt Carrot Muffins

After trying to find snacks for my clients following a low FODMAP diet and not coming up with much, I decided to create a low FODMAP muffin.  The low FODMAP diet is essentially an elimination diet which is useful for reducing symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome such as abdominal bloating, excessive wind, abdominal pain and changes in bowel habits (ie. constipation or diarrhoea).  I see a lot of people with varying degrees of these symptoms which apart from being uncomfortable and annoying, can often be life-limiting.

Many foods we commonly eat contain FODMAPs so it can be quite difficult to access foods for this diet, especially if you stay on it for some time as boredom may set in!

There are a few considerations when making low FODMAP muffins – you can’t use wheat flour, many fruit like apples or pears, dried fruit, honey or large amounts of milk or yoghurt.  All of these ingredients are usually featured in my normal muffin recipes.

Spelt flour is low FODMAP and can be used instead of regular wheat flour (which is high FODMAP).  Spelt is an ‘ancient’ variety of wheat, so it still contains gluten and is often tolerated by those who think they may be gluten-sensitive.   You can find spelt flour on the supermarket shelf now it is that popular!  It comes in white or wholemeal like regular flour, however you will need to add your own baking powder for a self raising form.  I used an organic wholemeal Australian produced spelt flour (which is the preferred choice for the diet).  Instead of raisins or sultanas I used a combination of walnuts with sunflower and pumpkin seeds for extra crunch and carrots are low FODMAP.  All up I think I produced a pretty good muffin.  For those of you with IBS, hopefully you can enjoy pain-free! :)

Spelt Carrot Muffins   –  Low FODMAP

  • 1 ½ cups wholemeal spelt flour
  • 1 ½ teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • ¼ cup brown sugar
  • ¼ cup walnuts, roughly chopped
  • 1 Tablespoon sunflower seeds
  • 1 Tablespoon pumpkin seeds
  • 2 carrots (150g), grated
  • 2 eggs
  • 3 Tablespoons oil
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla essence
  • ¼ cup lactose-free milk
  • ¼ cup low fat natural yoghurt

Preheat oven to 180 degrees and line 14 muffin-tray holes with paper cases.

Sift together flour, baking powder and cinnamon.  Stir in nuts, seeds and carrot.

In a separate bowl, whisk the eggs.  Add oil, vanilla, milk and yoghurt and whisk until well combined.

Pour wet ingredients into dry ingredients bowl and mix until just combined. 

Spoon into muffin trays.  Bake for 15 minutes, approx or until they are firm to touch (spring back)

Delicious while still warm!

Makes 14 Serves

Per Serving (42g  Muffin)  –   Calories 130      Protein 4g    Fat 7g   Sat fat 1g   Carbohydrate 12g    Fibre 2g

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Fig Date and Walnut Loaf

Last night while we were at the roller derby (yes, roller derby! which actually was fun) a friend of ours asked if I had any suitable cake recipes for someone with Type 2 diabetes and high cholesterol and I immediately thought of this one.

The requirements for someone with both conditions is to choose food that is low GI, low in saturated fat and high in soluble fibre.  This cake is all of those things – low GI, low in saturated fat and a good source of soluble fibre.  The other thing to consider of course is the serving size.  Keeping to around 15g of carbohydrate for a snack serve is a good guide (which is roughly equivalent to a medium sized piece of fruit)

This is a high fibre chewy style of cake that is rather delicious straight out of the oven and can be spread with low fat cream cheese or ricotta for a few extra calories.  It is very filling and keeps suprisingly well, but I can only guarantee 4 days as in my house it is all gone by then!

Enjoy :)

Fig Date and Walnut Loaf or Muffins

Makes 18 muffins or 1 loaf cut into 18 slices

  • ½ cup dried figs, chopped
  • ½ cup dried dates, chopped
  • 1/4 cup brown sugar
  • 50g margarine (or butter if you don’t have high cholesterol)
  • 125ml water
  • 1 teaspoon bicarb soda
  • ½ cup wholemeal plain flour
  • 1 cup wholemeal self raising flour
  • 1 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/3 cup chopped walnuts
  • 1 small banana, over-ripe and mashed
  • 1 large egg, lightly beaten
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla

Place figs, dates, sugar, butter or margarine and water in a small saucepan and cook for 3 minutes.  Remove from stove, add soda, stir through well, then allow to cool.

 Meanwhile, pre-heat oven to 160 degrees and grease and line the base of a loaf tin or paper line muffin trays.

 Sift together flours, ginger and cinnamon.  Add walnuts.  Mix together banana, egg and vanilla.  Add to date mixture, then fold in dry ingredients.

Spoon mixture into loaf tin or muffin tins and bake for 40 minutes/15 minutes approximately, until a skewer poked into the centre comes out clean.  Remove from tins and cool on wire rack

Per serve

122 calories

17g carbohydrate (approx 1 carbohydrate serve/exchange)

0.6g saturated fat

3g fibre

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spiced pea and corn pancakes

About 6 months ago I subscribed to a new magazine called HealthSmart which I quite enjoy.  It is published by readers digest and I got onto their website today looking for a carrot cake recipe they mentioned in this months mag.  I couldn’t find the cake recipe, but found these instead which I thought looked rather good and I particularly liked that they have oats in them.  So I thought I would give them a go and they are really yummy!

The type of curry paste you use will greatly vary the flavour of these pancakes.  I used a Malaysian curry paste which isn’t very hot, but you could use a green or red Thai curry paste which would add a bit of a chilli kick, or even tandoori paste (which I think I will try next time).  I would imagine that the addition of some fresh herbs, like coriander would also be good.

I served my pancakes (actually they look more like pikelets) with some really yummy plum & apple chutney I had made recently and it teamed really well with them.  Mango chutney,  tomato relish or even just natural low fat yoghurt (or natural yoghurt with a little horseradish in it) would also work well.  Or you can eat them just as they are.

You can find the original recipe here on the readers digest website.  Of course I changed it a little.  I used a greater amount of wholemeal flour and I just threw the frozen peas and corn in without thawing them, patting them dry etc etc, and hey, they worked out just fine!!  I also used such a small amount of oil (less than 2 teaspoons, where the original recipe mentions 2 Tablespoons!) when cooking them – in my new Tefal non-stick flat frying pan, which I LOVE! :)

Give them a go.  They are quick, easy, healthy and yummy.  What a great after school snack for hungry kids!

Enjoy :)

spiced pea and corn pancakes

makes 18

  • ½ cup wholemeal flour
  • ¼ cup plain flour
  • 1 ½ teaspoons baking powder
  • ¼ cup rolled oats
  • 2 teaspoons curry paste
  • 150 ml low-fat milk
  • 2 eggs, lightly beaten
  • 1 cup frozen corn kernels
  • 1⅓ cups frozen peas
  • ½ red capsicum, deseeded and diced
  • 1-2 teaspoons vegetable oil

1. Sift the plain and wholemeal flours and baking powder into a bowl, adding any bran left in the sieve. Stir in the oats, corn, capsicum and peas and salt and pepper if you like.

2. Blend the curry paste with 2 tablespoons of the milk, then stir this into the remaining milk and add the beaten eggs.

3. Make a well in the middle of the dry ingredients and add the eggs and milk. Mix until well combined.  Leave the batter to stand for 5 minutes to thicken.

4. Heat a large, heavy-based (Tefal 30cm) non-stick frying pan over a medium heat, then brush with a little of the oil. Using a large spoonful of batter per pancake, cook them in batches for 2–3 minutes until golden brown. Turn the pancakes over using a spatula, then cook the other side for 2–3 minutes. Remove from the pan and keep warm in a low oven while you cook the remaining batter. Serve warm.

 

Each pancake/pikelet has 60 calories and almost 2g of fibre

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Filed under Fritters, pancakes

Cornbread…yum!!!

It may be hard to believe considering my track record of posting many, many sweet recipes, but I actually prefer savoury foods over sweet.  One of those savoury foods which has always intrigued me is cornbread.  For some reason I have been on a mission to try to find a great cornbread recipe (during which time I have found many terrible ones)…and I think I finally have found it :)

Cornbread is very common in American cuisine, more specifically south or southwestern cuisine where it is often served with barbecued meats or chilli con carne.   Cornbread can be baked, steamed or fried.  These different cooking techniques will dramatically change both the taste and texture of the finished product.  Sometimes it can be so sloppy it is eaten with a spoon!  However I prefer the baked style which is also known as a quick bread = a bread which is quickly made since it doesn’t contain yeast. 

Some cornbread recipes I have tried in the past have been quite dry as the cornmeal or polenta used in it has a dry and gritty texture, but this also helps to provide cornbread with the lovely crunch.  With this recipe I added zucchini and used buttermilk (1/2 yoghurt, 1/2 milk)  to provide a little extra moisture.  I also added some fresh red capsicum as I think it teams really well with corn.  Roasted capsicum could be used instead.  Other ideas for more flavours to add are cold roasted pumpkin, crumbled fetta and/or fresh basil.  I think I will try all of those next time and make them into individual sized muffins.  They would be a great picnic food.

This recipe made 1 x 8 inch (20cm) square tin.  It is very easy to slice so can be slice quite thinly (or thickly of course).  It lends itself to spreading butter on it, but try to resist the urge as it is not necessary and will only add many extra unnecessary calories and saturated fat.  It is lovely warm straight out of the oven on its own, and I can imagine serving it with some delicious homemade tomato & basil or pumpkin soup….mmm. Enjoy :)

Cornbread with zucchini and capsicum

  • ½ cup wholemeal self raising flour
  • ½ cup white self raising flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup polenta
  • 2 Tablespoons castor sugar
  • 1 medium zucchini (150g) grated
  • ½ cup diced red capsicum
  • 1 cup buttermilk (I used half yoghurt, half milk)
  • 3 Tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 egg

 Line a 20cm square tin with baking paper.  Preheat oven to 170 degrees.

Into a large bowl, sift flours and baking powder, add salt, polenta, sugar, zucchini and capsicum.

In a smaller bowl, whisk together egg, buttermilk and olive oil, pour into dry ingredients and stir through until well mixed. 

Pour into prepared tin and bake for 30 mins approximately, until firm to touch on top. 

Leave to cool in tin for 5 minutes, then place on rack to cool.

Would easily slice into 24 pieces with each piece having:

312kJ = 74 calories

2g protein, 10g carbohydrate, 2.5g fat with only 0.5g saturated fat and 0.7g fibre

Oops, I forgot to add that it is a little odd putting sugar in a savoury bread, however I have tried it with and without and it definitely has a better texture WITH the sugar.  The end result is in no way sweet.

I also do not usually add salt when cooking but this is another time when it makes such a difference in bringing out all the lovely flavours of the bread.  It is only a small amount after all and would be a lot less than what is in regular bread :)

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Filed under Breads

Anzacs made with Olive Oil

Staying on my healthier biscuit theme, I love anzacs and always thought of them as a healthier choice, I guess due to the oats.  Of course the first time I made them I quickly realised that they weren’t so ‘healthy’ but that certainly didn’t stop me from continuing to make and eat them!

In the past I’ve tried to make an anzac with less sugar and butter, but they have never come close to the deliciousness of the original.  So I decided not to bother for a slight saving of calories and fat!

Thinking outside the square this time, I chose to just try reducing the saturated fat by using oil instead of butter and this seemed to work.  This version also has slightly less sugar than the original recipe and an increase in fibre from using wholemeal flour.

Note that this does not cut down the calories, just reduces the saturated fat – however this is important for everyone, and especially important for those with high cholesterol.  Regardless, these biscuits are very moreish.  Enjoy :)

Olive Oil Anzacs

Makes 20

  • 1/2 cup wholemeal flour
  • 1/2 cup quick cooking oats
  • 1/2 cup dessicated coconut
  • 1 1/2 Tablespoons sandy brown sugar
  • 2 Tablespoons golden syrup
  • 2 1/2 Tablespoons olive  oil
  • 2 teaspoons boiling water
  • 1/2 teaspoon bicarbonate of soda

Preheat oven to 170 degrees.  Line 2 flat trays with baking paper.

Sift flour into a medium sized bowl.  Add oats, coconut and sugar.

Place golden syrup and oil in small saucepan and heat until bubbles just start to appear on the surface.

Add boiling water and bicarbonate soda and stir until well mixed through.

Quickly pour into bowl with dry ingredients and mix through thoroughly. 

Shape heaped teaspoons of mix into balls and place on trays, flattening well.

Bake for 10-12 minutes, until golden brown.  When cooled, if there are any left, store in an airtight container.

Original recipe – each 14g biscuit has 65 calories, 3.7g fat, 2.6g saturated fat, 3.7g sugar, 0.5g fibre per biscuit

New version – each 14g biscuit has 64 calories, 3.7g total fat, 1.4g saturated fat, 3.1g sugar, 0.8g fibre

I figure that is an improvement!

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Chocolate Pecan & Cranberry Biscuits

It’s been a while between posts, but this one was worth waiting for as it’s time for a chocolate fix!

It is quite difficult to make a low fat biscuit as compared to a cake or muffin where you can use fruit purees in place of fat.  Using fruit purees in a biscuit significantly changes the texture of a biscuit however and makes it more cake-like.  This is not good!  It is also difficult to make a low fat biscuit without some butter due to the flavour and texture that butter provides a biscuit.  I was able  to cut down the amount of butter used however (important to lower saturated fat content) by using half oil and this seems to work well :)  I also managed to cut the sugar back a little in these, however again cutting back too much does affect the quality and makes a not-so-nice biscuit.

So after many trials and tribulations this version of delicious chocolate bikkies were a hit at work so I am confident you will enjoy them also.

They are a lovely little crisp biscuit with an increase in fibre (from using 1/2 wholemeal flour) and of course the reduced fat and sugar content as compared to a regular chocolate biscuit.  They are also rather quick and easy to make – they take around 10 minutes to mix up and I manage to do them all in one bowl (less washing up!!).  Once cold, store the biscuits in an air-tight container.  If you don’t want to cook all the mix at once it will keep in the fridge for 5 days (well covered so the mix won’t dry out) or you could try freezing it for a week.  Allow to completely thaw before baking. Most of all – Enjoy :)

Chocolate Pecan and Cranberry Biscuits

 

Makes 28 biscuits

  • 60g (¼ cup) butter, soft/room temperature
  • ½ cup (80g) sandy brown sugar
  • 2 Tbspn white sugar
  • ¼ cup canola oil
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • ½ cup plain flour
  • ½ cup wholemeal plain flour
  • ¼ cup Dutch cocoa powder 
  • ¼ cup pecans or walnuts, roughly chopped
  • 1/3 cup dried cranberries (craisins) or raisins (chop if large) or use half and half

Preheat oven to 170 degrees.  Line 2 biscuit trays with baking paper

In a large bowl and with a wooden spoon, beat together the butter, sugar and oil until light and creamy. Add egg and vanilla and beat until well combined.

Sift together both flours and cocoa. Add the pecans and craisins and stir to coat (this will evenly distribute the pecans and craisins through the biscuits). Tip flour mix into butter mix and stir through until well combined.

Place heaped teaspoons of mixture on biscuit trays, this is easiest done using 2 teaspoons – one to scoop out the mixture and the other to scoop the mix off that teaspoon onto the baking tray.  Flatten slightly and  leave a little room between each biscuit (this is important to help with even baking). Bake for 12 minutes.  They are actually best cooked one tray at a time in the centre of the oven.

Do not over-bake as they can become tough or dry.

Each 20g biscuit has 83 calories and 1.5g saturated fat

Compared with a standard chocolate biscuit (also 20g) which has approx 100 calories and more than 2g saturated fat

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Filed under Biscuits, Chocolate

Japanese Pancake – Okonomiyaki

Last Sunday the weather was so lovely that my husband and I decided to be tourists in our own city and went for a wander through The Rocks.  Of course we couldn’t miss walking through the market there and worked up quite an appetite doing so. 

There were plenty of food venders there to choose from and we set about finding a ‘healthy’ snack option.  That was when we saw these delicious looking pancakes being made.  Even though we frequent Japanese restaurants, I had never seen these pancakes before.  Called Okonomiyaki, there were 4 varieties to choose from – chicken, beef, seafood or vegetable.  All were chock full of vegetables and you know what a fan of vegetables I am, so that was it, decision made.

Okonomiyaki is a savoury Japanese style pancake that is made with a batter, shredded cabbage, other fresh grated/sliced vegetables & some type of meat/seafood – batters and fillings vary between the different regions of Japan. 

According to wikipedia, the name is derived from the word okonomi, meaning “what you like” or “what you want”, and yaki meaning “grilled” or “cooked”.  Normally they are served topped with mayonnaise, a Japanese style barbecue sauce and are sprinkled with bonito flakes which appear to ‘dance’ as they move around in the heat rising from the pancake.

The one we ordered contained chicken as well as a stack of vegetables and we asked for only a little of the bbq sauce on top.  It was so yummy I couldn’t wait to try making them at home.  So after googling for ideas, I set about assembling my own version this afternoon, copying the vegetables in last weeks version (but you could pretty much use whatever you like – whatever is in the fridge) but omitting the chicken, and they turned out great.  Quick, easy and oh so healthy with all of those veggies tucked inside.  They were so tasty that they didn’t need any sauce or topping.

They make quite a decent sized snack which fills you up, but doesn’t leave you feeling heavy.  Perfect!

Please, Enjoy :)

My version of the Japanese (Vegetable) Pancake “Okonomiyaki”

  • 1/6 of a cabbage, shredded (about 3 cups)
  • 1 cup green beans, sliced into 3cm lengths
  • ½ small red capsicum, sliced
  • 1 zucchini, halved lengthways and sliced thinly
  • 1 carrot, grated
  • 3 eggs
  • 1 cup wholemeal flour
  • 1 cup water (supposed to be dashi, but I didn’t have any)
  • 2 tspn Massel vegetable or chicken stock powder (for flavour since I didn’t have dashi)
  • pepper

In a large bowl mix together all of the chopped vegetables

In a smaller bowl, whisk together eggs, then gradually add flour.  Add water slowly and when fully mixed in and smooth, add stock powder and pepper.  Pour onto vegetables and mix well

Heat a small non-stick pan (with a matching lid – I used a saucepan lid) over low heat. Add a small amount of oil (1/2 tspn approx) and swish around to spread across base of pan. Using a large spoon, spoon about 3/4 cup of mixture into pan and flatten slightly with the back of the spoon.  Place the lid on the pan and cook over low heat until golden brown about 3-4 minutes.

Carefully flip pancake over and cook other side for 2-3 more minutes.

And there you have your delightful, delicious, chock full of veggies – japanese pancake ready to eat :)

Each pancake has 160 calories, 8g protein & 6g of fibre

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Raspberry & Cranberry Oat Bran Muffins

I have to admit that I prefer a muffin with some texture and substance and that is a good way to describe these.  They are jam packed with oats, wholemeal flour, dried fruit and berries.  Unfortunately the list of ingredients is rather long, however that is what helps to make them so interesting and they are well worth the effort.

I used to buy a similar muffin to these from muffin break years ago for a snack.  Admittedly the muffin break muffins are three times the size, however they have almost 500 calories in them.  That’s almost as many calories as a Big Mac! Yikes!  So these make a great tasty, lower fat and calorie snack alternative.  Enjoy!

Raspberry & Cranberry Oat Bran Muffins

Makes 24 muffins

Ingredients

½ cup plain flour

½ cup wholemeal self raising flour

1 teaspoon bicarbonate of soda

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

¼ cup white sugar

¼ cup brown sugar

¼ cup oat bran

1 ½ cups rolled oats

1/3 cup pitted dates, chopped

1/3 cup raisins, chopped

1/3 cup dried cranberries

1/2 cup frozen raspberries

1  large egg, lightly beaten

¼ cup olive oil

1 teaspoon  vanilla extract

½ cup low-fat milk

½ cup low-fat yoghurt

½ cup boiling water

Method

Line 2 x 12-hole muffin pans with muffin papers

Preheat the oven to 170 C.

In a large bowl, sift together the flours, bicarb soda and cinnamon. Mix in the sugars, bran, oats, dried fruit and frozen raspberries.

In a medium sized bowl, whisk together the egg, oil and vanilla.  Mix in the yoghurt and milk.

Make a well in the centre of the flour mixture and stir in the wet ingredients with a spatula until almost combined.

Stir in the boiling water until just mixed through.  Do not overmix as this can make the muffins tough.

Let batter stand for 15 minutes.

Spoon batter into muffin papers. Bake for 12-15 minutes or until muffins spring back when touched lightly in centre. Be careful not to over-cook.

 Each tasty 50g muffin has 110 calories and 1.7g fibre

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